Scott Adams’ Facebook Killer

“Facebook is primarily a record of your past. Imagine a competing service that I will name Futureme for convenience. It’s an online system in which you post only your plans, both immediate and future. As with FaceBook, you decide who can see your plans. You might, for example, allow only specific family members to see your medical plans, but all of your friends can see your vacation plans, or your plans to buy a new couch.

The interface for Futureme is essentially a calendar, much like Outlook. But it would include extra layers for hopes and goals that don’t have specific dates attached.

For every entry to your Futureme calendar, you specify who can see it, including advertisers. If you allow advertisers a glimpse of a specific plan, it would be strictly anonymous. Advertisers could then feed you ads specific to your plan, while not knowing who they sent it to. The Futureme service would be the intermediary.

Now imagine that you never have to see any of the incoming ads except by choice. If you plan to buy a truck in a month, you would need to click on that entry to see which local truck advertisements have been matched to your plans. This model turns advertising from a nuisance into a tool. You‘d never see an ad on Furureme that wasn’t relevant to your specific plans.”

This is such an amazing (obvious?) idea it’s hard to believe a) nobody has done it and b) that it isn’t in the works now. In the same way screenwriters dashed to their MacBook’s as word spread of the trapped miners in Chil

One thought on “Scott Adams’ Facebook Killer

  1. People post these kinds of things to Facebook all the time. So in a lot of ways, Facebook is already FutureMe, and more. That’s why marketers are falling over themselves to be a part of it.

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